Assemble your desired 3D printed modular home in just 10 minutes

Assemble your desired 3D printed modular home in just 10 minutes

From changing tides in the ecosystem of the workplace, washing away tradition as we know it, to a hint on the horizon about changes that might be coming to construction and building of homes, it’s all about clean lines, leaving as little footprint as possible, and having greater affordability and convenience.

Over the past few years the 3D printing industry has proven to be far more innovative than many had initially hoped; while the consumer-based market has grown spectacularly, many start-ups and even established businesses are still focused on developing a wide range of new and exciting 3D printing solutions. 

The biggest challenge among them (in terms of size, that is) must surely be the 3D printed homes. While usually problematic because of the sheer size of the printer necessary, two American designers have found a simple solution to that problem: why not just 3D print a home in modular ABS parts?

We’ve seen 3D printed building materials before and it still continues to impact architecture due to its great quality, durability and affordability. But now Zachary Schoch (with support from Eugene Lee) has developed a unique 3D printed snap-together architecture that stack over one another to form a building structure, just like Lego bricks. The modular pieces of the building are printed on a Euclid robot 3D printer using ABS filament.


Assembling the structure

Tension element – outer seam

(Source: bot laboratory; all photos credit: Nicole Caldwell)


The designers just exhibited their prototype at 3D Printer World 2015 in Burbank, California, and were able to fit the entire piece of 3D printed architecture into their car, and had the whole structure unpacked, unloaded, and put together in just 10 minutes. Not only is that amazing in itself, but the 10-foot-high structure was also 3D printed in only 18 hours. Disregarding packing and unpacking, it should be easily assembled in just a matter of a few minutes on its own.

In creating the pieces, Schoch and Lee employed a Euclid Robot 3D printer, using ABS for their material of choice. The prototype shows off their s-wall building system, which is full-scale, and due to the ABS materials is very strong and durable. The team states that because of the high-performance components, they are easily assembled by hand and larger elements if it were to be expanded should only require “minimal equipment.”

Such modular units can be easily assembled/ disassembled to form your desired house design with ease. As these units can be detached (when not in use), so the building blocks can be easily transported via car or small truck to any location. This latest 3D printing technique has opened new doors for construction of futuristic prefabricated homes without much hassle.
(Via 3dprint)

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