Indian State Karnataka to Build the World’s Largest Solar Park of 5 GW in Pavagada Town

Indian State Karnataka to Build the World’s Largest Solar Park of 5 GW in Pavagada Town

Clean energy has been one of the most important elements in Prime Minister Narendra Modi's plan for fast paced but sustainable development in India. 

Renewable energy is the most important weapon in India's fight against climate change.

India's population grows and the country accelerates its march to development, it will be impossible to meet the burgeoning demand for energy without dramatically increasing energy supply. 

Under leadership of PM Shri Narendra Modi, the government has already taken major steps in power sector at home and abroad.

Representative Image (Source: Headway Solar)

The International Solar Alliance, which brings together 121 countries, aims to mobilise one trillion dollar in investments for solar projects by 2030.

Now, to boost the power sector, the Karnataka state of India has announced plans to build 5 GW solar farm in the town of Pavagada, reports GCR

The proposed project will have a peak generating capacity of 5 GW, however the plans it has published so far stop at 2 GW of PV arrays over an area of 5 square kilometres, suggests state’s ministry of New and Renewable Energy.

Farmers Agreed to Lease Land for the Solar Farm 
(Image credit: Amit Jain/World Bank via GCR)

As per energy minister DK Shivakumar, 1,200 acrea of land have already acquired for setting up the plant and it could become the world’s largest solar park.

NTPC will develop the park and it has split the park into 50 MW lots for auction to investors. The completion of the first 2 GW of Pavagada is scheduled for 2021.

Farmers have agreed to 25-35-year leases for the land at a price of $300 per acre per year.

Five energy utilities in Karnataka have already signed an agreement with SECI to buy electricity from 1GW of the park’s capacity at $60.7/MWh for a period of 25 years.

Pavagada was chosen for the solar park because of a combination of various factors, including high sunlight exposure, backwardness of the area, and lesser demand for land. (Source: GCR)

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